Effects of Tobacco

Smokeless tobaccoTobacco is Harmful

Tobacco won’t give up on harming you, but you can give up on harming yourself. The more educated you are about the effects of tobacco, the better understanding you have on how it benefits you to quit.

Smoking Leads to Death

Causing more than 480,000 deaths each year in the United States, smoking is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States.1

Smoking Increases Health Risks

Smokers are more likely than nonsmokers to develop heart disease, stroke and lung cancer.1 It also harms nearly every organ of the body, which can translate into birth defects and a reduction in fertility.

 

Throat and lungsSmoking and Cancer

Smoking can cause cancer almost anywhere in your body.1,2 Such areas include (but are not limited to): the bladder, bloodstream, cervix, colon, rectum, esophagus, kidney, ureter, larynx, liver, oropharynx, pancreas, stomach, trachea, bronchus and lung. If nobody smoked, one in every three cancer deaths in the United States would not occur.

 Quitting and Reduced Risks

One year after quitting smoking, your risk for a heart attack drops significantly. Within two to five years after quitting, your risk for stroke could fall to about the same as a nonsmoker’s.2 Within five years, your risk for cancers of the mouth, throat, esophagus and bladder drop by half. After ten years, your risk for lung cancer drops by half.2


1 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014 [accessed 2015 Oct 5].

2 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: What It Means to You. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2010 [accessed 2015 Oct 5].

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